Category Archives: Chapter Meetings

May Chapter Meeting at Novartis

Understanding and Controlling RNA-protein Complexes Involved in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

Professor Anne Baranger, PhD
Director of Undergraduate Chemistry,
Faculty Assistant for Teaching and Learning, &
Adjunct Professor of Chemistry

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 6:30-8:30 pm

Myotonic dystrophy is the most prevalent form of muscular dystrophy and its two forms (DM1 and DM2) affect approximately 1 in 8000 people. These diseases cannot be cured, and there are no treatment options that delay disease progression. Both diseases are caused by large expansions of repeated sequences of DNA, which is transcribed into long repeated sequences of RNA. These RNAs are toxic, as a number of cellular proteins associate with them and as a result, these proteins are not available to perform their normal functions. Chief among these proteins is muscleblind-like protein (MBNL).  In healthy cells, MBNL controls the correct expression of proteins that are important for a number of processes including relaxing muscles after contraction and insulin regulation. We have investigated the binding specificity, thermodynamics, and kinetics of the MBNL1 protein for toxic repeat RNA sequences and normal RNA target sites. We have also identified small molecules that will associate with the toxic repeat RNA and release MBNL.                                                                                

Anne Baranger received a B.S. in Chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Yale University. She joined the Wesleyan University chemistry faculty in 1996, the University of Illinois chemistry faculty in 2006, and the University of California, Berkeley chemistry faculty in 2011. At the University of Illinois, she was Associate Head of the Department, Director of Graduate Studies, and was a Chancellor’s Fellow in the I-STEM Education Initiative. At UC Berkeley, she is Director of Undergraduate Chemistry and a Faculty Assistant for Teaching and Learning.

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 6:30-8:30 pm

Light supper* and networking 6:30pm – 7:00pm

NOTE: Registering w/ Eventbrite will say FREE, however fee will be collected at the door

$5 / members, $10 / non-members

Register at:  http://ebawismaychapter2012.eventbrite.com

Location: Novartis  5400 Hollis St, Building X-310 Emeryville, CA

Park in front of building – Directions here

Non Scientists and Men Welcome

EbAWIS Chapter Meeting January 2012 – Networking

East Bay Association for Women In Science Presents Our most anticipated event:

An Evening of Networking

­An entire Chapter meeting devoted to networking!  Our venue will guide you through a review of networking strategies; then, effective networking games that introduce you to many people will offer you the opportunity to:

  • Meet scientists as well as professionals interested in an affiliated career if you are job searching
  • Enhance your contacts if you are established in your present position
  • Polish presentation skills before the interview
  • Gather invaluable feedback about yourself in a friendly, fun, and informal environment

Light Dinner and Networking at 6:30 pm

Structured Program at 7:00 pm

Thursday, January 26, 2012

NOTE: Registering w/ Eventbrite will say free; however, fee will be collected at the door

Fee: $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

**REGISTER HERE**

Location: Novartis, 5400 Hollis St, Building X-310 Emeryville, CA

Parking is in front of the Building

***Click Here for DIRECTIONS***

ebAWIS is a nonprofit organization and the fee covers cost of food

Scientists and Science Enthusiasts, Men and Women are Welcome!

Meetings are open to non-AWIS members

November 2011 Chapter Meeting

Coming Soon – Nanobiology!

Microfluidics in Next Gen Proteomics

Amy E. Herr, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley

Amy E. Herr received her BS degree from Caltech and her MS (1999) and PhD (2002) degrees from Stanford in Mechanical Engineering. At UC Berkeley, her research focuses on instrumentation innovation to advance quantitation in life sciences and clinical problems.  Translational impact of her research program spans from tools for fundamental research (cell signaling) to near-patient disease diagnostics. Her major awards include the NIH New Innovator Award (2010-15), the NSF CAREER Award (2011), the Eli Lilly & Co. New Investigator Award in analytical chemistry, the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship (2010-12, chemistry), the DARPA Young Faculty Award (2009-11), the 2009 Hellman Family Faculty Fund Award from UC Berkeley, and the 2008 Regents’ Junior Faculty Fellowship from UC.  In 2007 she was recognized as an Outstanding Mentor by Sandia National Labs. She chaired (2009) & vice-chaired (2007) the Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on the Physics & Chemistry of Microfluidics.

While the genomics revolution has had sweeping impact on our understanding of life processes, the “proteomics revolution” still remains unrealized.  Proteins are more directly linked to function than genes, but proteins are also dynamic and more biochemically complex. Consequently, protein analysis often demands multi-stage biochemical assays to measure not one, but multiple physicochemical properties.  At UC Berkeley, we are introducing novel non-discretizing integration strategies to answer this problem. This talk will highlight multi-stage assays uniquely enabled by our ‘µMosaic’ fabrication technique:  an approach that allows regional photopatterning of 2D microchambers with heterogeneous, discrete nanomaterials.  In one example, I will summarize our recent progress towards fast, hands-free, and perhaps even quantitative Western blotting, for analysis of specimens from clinical sample repositories. Our ultimate goal is to understand the life processes – including development and disease through quantitative bioinstrumentation.

 

Thursday, November 17, 2011, 6:30-8:30 pm

Light supper* and networking 6:30pm – 7:00pm

NOTE: Registering w/ Eventbrite will say free;  however, a fee will be collected at the door.

Fee: $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

**REGISTER HERE**

http://novembernanoebawis.eventbrite.org

Location: Novartis , 5400 Hollis St, Building X-310 Emeryville, CA

Parking is in front of the Buidling

***Click Here for DIRECTIONS***

ebAWIS is a nonprofit organization and the fee cover cost of food

NON-SCIENTISTS and MEN ARE ALL WELCOME!

September 2011 Chapter Meeting

“Cancer and Aging: Rival Demons”

Prof. Judith Campisi , Ph.D.
Buck Institute

Judith Campisi received a PhD in Biochemistry from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and postdoctoral training at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School.  As an Associate Professor at the Boston University Medical School, she launched an interest cellular senescence and its role in tumor suppression and aging.  She joined Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1991.  In 2002, she established a second laboratory at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, where she is a Professor.  At both institutions, she established a broad program to understand the interface between cancer and aging.  Her laboratory has made several pioneering discoveries in these areas, and her research continues to challenge and alter existing paradigms.  In recognition of her research, she received numerous awards, including MERIT awards from the US National Institute on Aging, the Allied Signal Corporation, Gerontological Society of America and American Federation for Aging Research, the Longevity prize from the IPSEN Foundation and the Bennett Cohen award from the University of Michigan.  She currently serves on numerous national and international editorial and advisory boards.

Age is the largest single risk factor for developing a plethora of chronic diseases, ranging from neurodegeneration to cancer.  Most-age-related diseases are degenerative.  Cancer, however, is a gain-of-function disease.  Is there a common biology that links cancer and the degenerative diseases of aging?  I will discuss the possibility that processes designed to suppress cancer – specifically DNA damage and senescence responses – link cancer to degenerative disease through an inflammatory process that is controlled by and evolutionarily-conserved longevity pathway.  Our hypotheses indicate that we must be clever and knowledgeable if we are to intervene into aging processes that promise to ameliorate many of the chronic diseases of aging, including cancer.

When: Thursday, September 22, 2011 from 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Where: Novartis* , 5300 Hollis St, Building X-310 Emeryville, CA
Cost: $5 for members, $10 for non-members, fee collected at door
RSVP:  http://ebawisseptembermeeting.eventbrite.com
Transit–BART and free Shuttle by Emery Go Round from MacArthur BART on Hollis Line.
Parking and registration directions:  Park at lot located next to Building X, on Hollis St., north of 53rd St.  Check-in at Building X.   Directions to Novartis here.
Why drive alone? Carpool and get to know a friend!

 

 

July 2011 Chapter Meeting

“Cell Engineering for the Production of Biofuels”

Pamela Peralta-Yahya, Ph.D.
Joint BioEnergy Institute

UC Berkeley

When: Thursday, July 28, 2011 from 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Where: Novartis* , 5400 Hollis St, Building X-310 Emeryville, CA
Cost: $5 for members, $10 for non-members.
RSVP: When registering w/ Eventbrite, it will say FREE, but a fee will be collected at the door.
Directions
Transit–BART and free Shuttle by Emery Go Round from MacArthur BART on Hollis Line
*Parking and registration directions:  Park at lot located next to Building X, on Hollis St., north of 53rd St.  Check-in at Building X
Why drive alone? Carpool and get to know a friend!

Flyer

Dr. Pamela Peralta-Yahya received her B.A. in Chemistry and Biology from Macalester College in 2003. She did her Ph.D. in Chemistry at Columbia University in 2008 in the laboratory of Virginia W. Cornish. Dr. Peralta-Yahya then joined Prof. Jay Keasling’s research group at the Lawrence Berkeley Lab’s Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI) where she works on the development of novel potential advanced biofuels. Dr. Peralta-Yahya’s current research interest lies in the engineering of enzymes for use in metabolic pathways for the production of novel chemical compounds that can be used as potential biofuels, specialty chemicals, or pharmaceuticals.

Rising petroleum costs, trade imbalances, and environmental concerns have stimulated efforts to advance the microbial production of fuels from biomass. Two cost-limiting steps in this process are the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic material and the microbial production of biofuels with properties similar to existing fuels. In this seminar, we will discuss synthetic biology approaches that address these two bottlenecks. First, the development of a general high-throughput selection for bond cleavage reactions and its application to the directed evolution of cellulases. Second, the engineering of a microbial platform for the production of a terpene based biosynthetic diesel directly from simple sugars. Both of these approaches illustrate an emerging area of synthetic biology: the engineering of the cell for the production of chemicals.

Everyone is welcome, including non-scientists and men. If you are not an AWIS member yet, please join us!